Tag Archives: Non-Compete Agreements

New Noncompete Agreement Law in Massachusetts

Introduction On July 31, 2018, after years of debate and attempts at compromise, the Massachusetts legislature finally passed a bill that will fundamentally alter the use of noncompete agreements in the Commonwealth.  The bill was signed by Governor Baker on August 10, 2018, and the law will go into effect on October 1, 2018.  The new law will apply only to agreements that are signed on or after October 1, 2018. The law does not prohibit the use of noncompete agreements altogether, but it does create specific standards regarding the enforceability of such agreements. Coverage The new law applies to …

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Noncompete Agreement Bill Finally Passes in Massachusetts

On July 31, 2018, after years of debate and attempts at compromise, the Massachusetts legislature finally passed a bill that will fundamentally alter the use of noncompete agreements in the Commonwealth.  If the bill is signed by Governor Baker, the law will go into effect on October 1, 2018, and will apply only to agreements that are signed after that date.  The bill does not prohibit the use of noncompete agreements altogether, but it does create specific standards regarding the enforceability of such agreements.  Click here for the full alert.

Prepare to Consider Your Former Employees Your New Competition

There’s nothing that gets employers more fired up than a former employee jumping ship to join a competitor. But, in an effort to prevent such future angst, you’ve had your employees sign a non-compete. You’re golden, right? Perhaps not. When an employer has a non-compete in hand, it can mistakenly think it is fully protected from post-employment competition. Such a mistake can be costly. First, you may have to litigate the enforceability of the agreement. Then, you stand to lose a bunch of business when it turns out the agreement is worth less than the piece of paper it’s typed …

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Five Mistakes To Avoid in Drafting Non-Compete and Non-Solicitation Agreements

Employers often seek business protection by entering into agreements with employees that restrict their business activities after leaving employment. Such agreements may prohibit former employees from using confidential information, from soliciting customers or employees, and from competing against the employer. Time is of the essence when an employer learns that a former employee is violating his or her contractual obligations. Typically, the employer will quickly send a “cease and desist” notice to the employee and to his or her new employer. In some instances, the employer will also seek an expedited order in court that prohibits the former employee from …

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