Tag Archives: Checklists

Takeaways for Employers on the Hillary E-mail Debacle

5 Reasons Employers Should Prohibit Employees From Using Personal Email Accounts Recently, a political firestorm has erupted as news stories revealed that Former Secretary of State (and likely Presidential Candidate) Hillary Clinton utilized private e-mail accounts to conduct government business during her tenure as Secretary of State.  Pundits from the left, right, and center have weighed in on the political impact of Clinton’s e-mail practices.  But putting politics aside, as the story of Clinton’s e-mail usage unfolds, employers should be asking if it is a good idea to allow their employees to send work-related e-mails on private e-mail accounts.  In …

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Men at Work: California Public Works Projects and Prevailing Wage Laws

California’s prevailing wage law, set forth in the California Labor Code, provides that each worker employed by contractors or subcontractors on a public works project must be paid not less than the general prevailing wage rate for work of a similar character in the locality in which the work is performed. Prevailing wages are significantly higher than the minimum wage. California legislature has recently passed laws that expand the scope of available remedies and time periods for enforcement as well as access to certain information in certified payroll records. Previously, only the Labor Commissioner could obtain liquidated damages equal to …

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Five Mistakes To Avoid in Drafting Non-Compete and Non-Solicitation Agreements

Employers often seek business protection by entering into agreements with employees that restrict their business activities after leaving employment. Such agreements may prohibit former employees from using confidential information, from soliciting customers or employees, and from competing against the employer. Time is of the essence when an employer learns that a former employee is violating his or her contractual obligations. Typically, the employer will quickly send a “cease and desist” notice to the employee and to his or her new employer. In some instances, the employer will also seek an expedited order in court that prohibits the former employee from …

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Holiday Parties: Proceed With Caution

Because of the liability exposure inherent in holiday parties, many employers have decided to forego hosting such events.  For the employers who will host holiday events, the planning may have already started.  In either scenario, the time is right for employers to review their policies and practices to ensure protection from certain risks presented by employer-sponsored holiday parties. The following are recommendations to assist in careful planning and hosting of holiday parties: Employer’s Handbook – Review policies for employer‑sponsored social functions.  These policies should include harassment policies specifically addressing employer‑sponsored social events such as holiday parties.  Further, the employer should …

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An Employer’s Checklist to Workers’ Comp Claims

How well an employer handles workplace injuries is important to getting injured workers the care they need and expect while minimizing the cost of claims.  Although each situation is unique, an employer should generally take the following steps upon receiving notice that an employee has been injured on the job or sustained an occupational disease: Provide the injured employee with any necessary emergency medical attention, which should include drug testing. Immediately after receiving notice of a work injury, furnish the injured employee with a panel of at least 3 physicians from which the employee may select an authorized treating physician. …

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