Category Archives: Personnel Files

Resolutions for a Harassment Free New Year

Dear Clients, Colleagues and Friends: The year 2017 marked a seismic shift in the way the nation views sexual harassment. Time Magazine named “the silence breakers” as its Persons of the Year.  The words “me too” went from a simple phrase, to a hashtag, to a movement.  And, a deluge of claims of sexual misconduct and harassment exposed and toppled the giants of Hollywood, the news media, government, and so many other high profile industries.   While some employers may take comfort in the fact that the stories of sexual misconduct and harassment that dominate the news involve the rich, the …

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Workplace Now: The “Localization” of Employment Law – What you Don’t Know Can Hurt

It is no secret these days that many workforces, particularly over the last five years, are now subject to numerous state and municipal laws that seek to shape and regulate numerous areas of the workplace (many of which are often conflicting) .  Given the gridlock that has been in place for almost a decade in Congress, state legislatures and cities have accelerated their oversight of employers and have imposed their own laws. In fact, there are literally hundreds of examples of how the scope of local regulation has changed, but perhaps the most breath-taking took place this year in the …

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Significant Change to CT’s Personnel Files Act

Connecticut law makers’ mad dash to the end of the General Assembly session, results in major changes to the State’s employee Personnel Files Act. Senate Bill 910, passed on May 24, 2013, makes a number of key changes that will impact how Connecticut employers discipline and terminate employees. The following provisions warrant particular attention:

New California Employment Statutes for 2013

As we have reported every year, the California Legislature likes to create more procedural hurdles for, and more potential claims against, employers.  2013 will be no exception. AB 1396 & AB 2675 (Commission Agreements) AB 1396 requires all commission-based compensation be in writing.  And, it must specify how commissions will be calculated and paid, a copy must be given to the employee, and the employer must receive a signed receipt acknowledgement from the employee.  Also, the terms survive the agreement’s expiration and remain in effect unless the employee is no longer working under its terms or the commission agreement is superseded. …

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